Core stability for Dancers – try our Dance Pilates

Are you a dancer who wants to improve your technique, flexibility or just prevent those niggly injuries that can keep you from training?

Here at Bureta physio we have a dedicated physiotherapist who can help you with this.

As a dancer you will be aware of the importance of core stability to improve turns, control arabesque and prevent many back issues.  You may already being lots of training for it but are you really doing what you need to do to get the most out of it.

Core stability is not about doing hundreds of sit ups, getting a ‘six-pack’ or being able to hold a plank position for 3 minutes (although these do still have their purposes!)

True Core Stability IS…

  • The ability to control the spine dynamically, that is, with movement.
  • Fine co-ordination of all of the muscles that control your trunk, not just the abdominals.
  • The ability to adjust the level of control needed, depending on the situation.
  • Creating a stable base off which to work the limbs.
  • Stabilizing the mid-section to allow smooth and effective transfer of force through the body.

While everyone needs some level of core stability, some people need more than others. For a dancer, core stability needs to be fantastic fine coordination of all of the muscles to allow controlled mobility of the pelvis and spine with movement, rather than bracing in one spot.

So How Do We Do That?
True core stability exercises are extremely hard to do properly and very easy to do wrong. The purpose of our specific dance pilates courses are to ensure you understand the finer details required to gain true core stability and a progressive system of exercises the train your muscles in the best possible way.

Flexibility
Our dance pilates classes also provide ways to improve your flexibility in a safe but effective manner.  Unfortunately we often see injuries that are caused by over-stretching, especially on young bodies that are still developing.  Its not that as a physiotherapists we are against improving flexibility but this can be achieved through controlled and safe methods not putting joints or muscles through undue stress.

Lucy Poole, one of our physiotherapists here at Bureta is experienced with working with dancers both from a amateur level through to professional so you can get the most from your dancing.  This can be through a one to one physiotherapy session, one to one pilates classes or in our group dance pilates classes.

The goal of the classes is to improve dance technique and reduce dance related injuries that we see a lot in the clinic.  Simple postural and muscle balance adjustments can make a huge difference to current performance and prevent time off due to injury.

They will run for 6 consecutive weeks at a cost of $80 for 6 consecutive sessions.

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Heading to the slopes to ski or snowboard? – you have got to read this first!

Ok so the last couple of days in the bay have been super cold for our standards

Winter is here and many people will head to the snow for a well earned break. While skiing/boarding comes naturally to some, others spend most of their time unsuccessfully negotiating the equipment and terrain. Whatever your level of experience, skiing/ boarding can be hazardous and contribute to injury. The physiotherapists in our practice can help. We can ensure that you are prepared for the slopes by minimising your injury risk through specific exercise programmes, fitness regimes, strengthening and warm up, stretching and cool down techniques.

To avoid injury this snow season, the physiotherapists in our practice recommend you:

Be fit to ski/snowboard

Begin to incorporate ski-specific exercises into your regular exercise routine at least eight weeks prior to your holiday. This will promote use of the muscles and joints required for skiing. Strengthen the muscles specific to snow sports (thighs, butts, core stabilisers and triceps) to reduce the risk of injury and increase your enjoyment and endurance on the slopes. We can outline ski-specific or board-specific exercises whilst prescribing a conditioning programme to improve your core stability and muscle strength. Ultimately, your performance on the slopes relies on your fitness, so talk to us about how to achieve an optimal fitness level. We have access to a number of gyms around Tauranga and can write you a ski or board specific program and you won’t be tied into a long term membership!! Talk to us about Bureta Physio’s corporate gym rates 

Look after your back

When travelling distances to reach the mountain, rest every two hours and stretch. See one of our physiotherapists for effective stretching advice, and if you have had problems with your back come into the clinic and pick up a Lumbar roll for the trip which means when you unfold yourself after the trip you are ready to go

Warm up, stretch and cool down

Before hitting the slopes, warm up like you would with any other sporting activity. Stretch your thigh, calf and arm muscles check out or blog on dynamic stretches. Start your day with easy runs to loosen up (make sure you also do this after each rest break.) Once you have finished skiing for the day, remembers to cool down. These activities will better prepare your body to avoid injury. We can show you warm up, stretching and cool down techniques.

Ski within your capabilities

Beginners should take advantage of a ski lesson and not succumb to the pressure of keeping up with experienced skiers. Don’t be afraid to rest when you find yourself getting tired. Fatigue can increase your injury risk. And remember, the more unfit you are, the more tired you will become. Injuries often happen on that last run of the day!

To avoid injury on the snowfields this winter, consult one of our physiotherapists on how to best prepare your body.

My Doctor said I should do Pilates? -Tell me more!

Ok, so your Doctor has recommended Pilates so what is it and why have they said this?

What is Pilates?

Pilates is a method of body conditioning that was developed nearly 100 years ago in Germany. It is unique because the technique works on strengthening, lengthening and toning muscles as well as improving posture and increasing your flexibility and balance.

What are the benefits of Pilates?

Pilates can have huge benefits on health and wellness and injury:

  • Improves strength, flexibility, balance and coordination
  • Develops strong core
  • Reduces tension and stress
  • Improves posture
  • Increases mental focus and body awareness
  • Tones and builds long, lean muscles
  • Increases vitality and sense of well-being
  • Increases circulation and endurance
  • Helps prevent injury, rehabilitate injuries and reduce chronic pain
  • Great adjunct to your normal sport and exercise regime.

 

Why do Physio’s at Bureta use Pilates?

Here at Bureta Physio we use clinical Pilates on a daily basis with our patients both in a class and 1-to-1 setting. All our Pilates sessions/ and classes are instructed by qualified Physiotherapists. It is often used in conjunction with other modalities to treat a variety of injuries ranging from knee pain, lower back pain through to neck pain. This is based on current literature that demonstrates the importance of correct movement patterns and advocates the retraining of deep stabilising muscles around the hip, lower back and neck region to biomechanically load the spine and peripheral joints correctly. Check out our class schedule for the best times to suit you, plus we have specific Mens Pilates (MPX for the macho types out there) which is hugely popular.

Who would it benefit?

  • All age ranges, although must be able to get on and off the floor without assistance.
  • Patients with current or previous lower back, hip or neck pain.
  • Patients getting back into exercise.
  • Patients who are currently active but wish to address or prevent ‘niggly’’ injuries.
  • Patients who wish to improve flexibility caused by poor posture, lack of exercise or degenerative changes.
  • Patients who would benefit from relaxation and an improved sense of well-being.

If you feel you would benefit from Pilates classes or you would like to discuss anything further then please do not hesitate to contact the clinic on:

07 5761860 or buretaphysio@xtra.co.nz

Running Injuries: Can I train through?

Authored by Donna Withers – Physiotherapist @ Bureta

This is a common question we get asked. As a runner it is always our goal to be running one hundred percent pain free. Unfortunately in reality this is often not the case as many runners are constantly dealing with a niggle whether it be a slight pain in the knee to a tight calf or a niggling hamstring. These small niggles and aches often don’t bother us enough to need to take time out from running but do stop training from being enjoyable.

There are a wide range of running injuries that are common complaints amongst the running population. These range from severe injuries which require a lot of time off to mild aches that can come and go. You can reduce the risk of needing to take too much time off with how you go about managing your injury. Taking the time to seek treatment and getting a treatment plan that focuses on the causative and underlying factors and developing a long term management plan for prevention which often includes strengthening, stretching and regular maintenance through the use of a roller and massage can significantly reduce time off.

An example of a very common running injury is Patellofemoral Syndrome also known as “runners knee” this is the irritation of the cartilage on the underside of your knee cap. This is commonly seen in runners who don’t have good biomechanics with loading/running. This can be caused by a number of factors i.e. weakness of the quads, gluts, hips or poor foot control/overpronation (rolling in). By focusing on the correct strength exercises which improve biomechanics and therefore reduce the loading of your knee training can be continued by reducing intensity and cross training.

Prevention is always the key whether you have an injury or you are just looking to avoid one your physiotherapist at Bureta can assess your biomechanics and work with you to develop a management plan to keep you out on the track. See our previous blog on some tips for running injury prevention. Remember the best injury cure is injury prevention – happy running!!

7 tips for getting fit

STEPS TO GETTING FIT

Made a promise to yourself to get fit this New year? If you did, you’re not alone. Many of our patients make this same promise to themselves however find it hard to get motivated once the summer months are over. The physiotherapists in this practice can help.

We can recommend exercises that are designed specifically for you to achieve your desired level of fitness. The more you repeat and become aware of an activity, the easier it becomes. Our practice looks at types of exercises/activities, specific workloads, durations of activities/sessions and intensity guidelines and can devise a plan to help you achieve your target fitness level.

To help we have seven tips to help you become motivated and fit.

Tip 1 Start slow

If you’ve been inactive for some time it’s important to start slowly and gradually build up. Begin with low impact activities such as walking, swimming or using an exercise bike. We can help suggest an appropriate level to start at based on your current fitness.

Tip 2 Know yourself

Talk to us about your medical history or any problematic areas which may affect your choice of activity. We can help make exercise safer.

Tip 3 Warm up

Remembers to warm up, warm down and stretch before and after gentle activity to minimise muscle soreness. If you’re not sure – we can show you some warm up techniques.

Tip 4 Come prepared

Make sure you have appropriate footwear for your activity and a bottle of water to keep you hydrated.

Tip 5 Venues

Gyms are great places to get active but you must ensure that you are well supervised. Not a gym person – then try something else – go bushwalking or go for a bike ride! Even simply take the stairs, walk to the train station or local shops! Better still see us for regular assessment and instruction.

Tip 6 Record your progress

Keep a diary or log of your progress – it will serve as a reminder of how far you’ve come and give you encouragement if you’re felling disheartened. Reward yourself with something healthy when you achieve mini goals.

Tip 7 Workout with someone

Core Strength and Back Pain

What is Core Stability?

This is a term which describes the firmness and stability of your trunk muscles. These are the muscles which wrap around your trunk like a cylinder or brace. They lie between your ribs and your hip bones just like the corsets worn in Victorian times.

The core or trunk muscles are the foundations of the body. The back, arms and the legs work much better if the trunk muscles are stable. When the trunk muscles are working together they support your body when walking, bending, lifting and even sitting upright and give you more energy.

Once working correctly they will also help protect the back from injury.

Why is Core Stability useful in the treatment of back pain?

Pain has been shown to turn muscles off. Pain encourages sufferers to adopt pain relieving positions but ultimately they add to the problem. This leads to recurrent low back pain. Improving core stability will help stop this pain or reduce it a lot and encourage better posture which will prevent further pain. Improving posture may reduce pain immediately. Improving core stability will reduce pain over time.

How can we help you?

We need to teach your muscles how to work again. This training is done one on one with your physiotherapist. Once the muscles are working correctly we can then give you a programme of exercises to improve your strength even further. These need to be monitored and are progressed as the muscles slowly strengthen and work together correctly. We also offer pilates classes and strength classes which incorporate core strength. Call us now to book into our classes. New times and more classes coming 2015…………. New schedule up on website in Jan

Is your stretching program putting you at risk?

Stretching – Recent research shows us a number of factors that affect when, why and for how long we stretch.

The latest research suggests that general stretching prior to exercise does not prevent injuries- in fact traditional static stretching (where a muscle is held on stretch for a period of time) has been shown to decrease muscle contraction for 20mins post stretch- adversely affecting muscle performance.
Dynamic stretching has been shown to be much more effective at preparing the body for exercise. Dynamic stretching is about preparing the body for sport and involves movement to end range to put stretch on tissues. This type of stretch signals to the body that we are preparing for action and has been more effective at preparing the body for exercise.
Traditional static stretching can be useful after exercise to prevent post exercise soreness
Talk to our team of Physiotherapists to devise the most appropriate dynamic stretching program prior to your exercise – this can benefit the weekend warrior going for a run, surf or cycle etc, right up to the elite sports people that we look after.

Those people with specific injuries may need to stretch these areas in order to prevent them causing further problems
Physiotherapist uses stretching and joint mobilisation to gain range of movement in strutcures that have lost range. This can be either a joint, or your soft tissues (muscles/ connective tissue/ ligaments)