Is your ‘new work office’ a pain in the neck?

Is your ‘new work office’  a pain in the neck?- Quick Tips to Avoid Back & Neck Pain Whilst Working From Home during Covid-19.

With the unprecedented times we currently face, many of us find we are working in a different environment at the moment- One not designed for sitting eight hours a day….

Quick Tips from your friendly Physio:

  1. Comfort is key! Set up your workspace well- invest in a wireless/plug in keyboard & mouse. And even treat yourself to a laptop stand (or a stack of books works just as well).
  2. Take regular breaks- AWAY from your workspace; grab a glass of water, check on the kids or you could even do one of those stretches your physio prescribed you!
  3. Sit less!- be creative with cardboard boxes to make a standing desk, stand during online meetings or webinars, walk during phone calls.
  4. Use your Lunch Break to get MOVING! Even if you can’t spare half an hour to hit your daily activity quota, get creative- Walk Up & Down the Stairs, March on the Spot, or grab a ball and head outside with the kids.
  5. Whenever you feel uncomfortable- get up and stretch! Some examples below to try.

Levator Scapulae Stretch:

Gently take your nose towards your right armpit. Place your right hand on top of your head and apply slight over pressure into the stretch.
Hold here maintaining a gentle stretch for 10-20 seconds.
Repeat to the other side

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Mid-Back Rotation:
Cross your left leg over your right leg, placing your right hand on the top knee.
Rotate the body to the left, looking over your left shoulder.
Hold here for 10-20 seconds
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If you’re doing these things and still struggling with pain, KEEP CALM AND CALL YOUR PHYSIO! We are open for Online Video Consultations.

Call 075761860 OR email: kim@buretaphysio.co.nz to book your appointment TODAY.

Written by Kimberley Pilbrow

Is your stretching program putting you at risk?

Stretching – Recent research shows us a number of factors that affect when, why and for how long we stretch.

The latest research suggests that general stretching prior to exercise does not prevent injuries- in fact traditional static stretching (where a muscle is held on stretch for a period of time) has been shown to decrease muscle contraction for 20mins post stretch- adversely affecting muscle performance.
Dynamic stretching has been shown to be much more effective at preparing the body for exercise. Dynamic stretching is about preparing the body for sport and involves movement to end range to put stretch on tissues. This type of stretch signals to the body that we are preparing for action and has been more effective at preparing the body for exercise.
Traditional static stretching can be useful after exercise to prevent post exercise soreness
Talk to our team of Physiotherapists to devise the most appropriate dynamic stretching program prior to your exercise – this can benefit the weekend warrior going for a run, surf or cycle etc, right up to the elite sports people that we look after.

Those people with specific injuries may need to stretch these areas in order to prevent them causing further problems
Physiotherapist uses stretching and joint mobilisation to gain range of movement in strutcures that have lost range. This can be either a joint, or your soft tissues (muscles/ connective tissue/ ligaments)

Upper back pain

Thoracic spine (upper back) pain

The main cause of this problem is injury to the small joints either side of the spine.

Risk factors for the development of this problem include:

Poor seated posture – or spending too long sitting
Limited thoracic extension – due to slouching posture
Reduced mid back rotation – again due to prolonged sitting and not enough movement of these joints.
Muscle imbalance between the chest muscles and the back muscles.
Treatment for this injury includes mobilization of the stiff and injured joints, massage, dry needling or acupuncture and stretching to help settle the affected area. A rehabilitation program is then devised to treat the risk factors and causes of the injury.

To help prevent this happening follow these simple exercises:

Lie over a rolled up towel on the floor placed horizontally across your back. Stretch your arms up over your head and feel the gentle stretch as your encourage your upper back to extend. Hold each position for 30 seconds and try to do 3 levels of your back.

Lie on your back on a Swiss Ball – then relax the arms out to the side at 90 degrees and keep them there for 30 seconds – rest for 30 seconds and repeat three times.